O Captain! My Captain!

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DeSoto Lake, once a part of the Missouri River, frozen over in February.

I first came across the name Captain James McGarry back in 2012. I knew then there was something special about this steamboat captain, but, fully delving into his story had to go on the back burner until after I finished my masters. Once I was able to delve in, just how special he and his story are quickly became clear. I am what I refer to as a “stay-at-home historian.” What that means is that I’m an independent historian, but, I am also a stay-at-home mom.  Funding is hard to come by and the records I can order depend largely on what’s left over from the family budget at the end of the month. Over the last couple of months I began to realize just how quickly I was running out of free resources or records that could be obtained with ‘left over money.’ I needed funding. I needed it soon or else all the work I’ve done would be for nothing- my research would stall.

The prospect of not being able to properly tell the Captain’s story is a source of anxiety for me. I look at his story and I see not only a noble man but a way to bring a part of history that most may not even really consider to a new audience. I see it as something that sparks someone’s imagination and makes them think, “History is actually cool.” There is a certainly a unique kind of appeal and draw to it. Along the way I developed a hunch, a feeling, whatever you want to call it that this would also be “it” for me. That this would be the story that gets noticed. Hopefully, I’m not jinxing myself by saying this, but, so far it is turning out to be just that. I was over the moon when the paper about him that I presented at the Missouri Valley History Conference received an award from my alma mater . Over the moon does not begin to describe how I feel today. I am proud to announce that I am one of five recipients of the BYU Charles Redd Center’s Independent Research and Creative Works Award. It will fund a significant portion of my research, primarily my research trip to Helena, Montana. I have also setup a GoFundMe account to help with the remainder of the costs.

As excited as I am, I am also greatly humbled. Sometimes you do not find research projects, they find you. I am thankful the story of Captain McGarry found me. Tonight when my husband and I pop a bottle of champagne in celebration we will not only toast my supporters, we will toast the Captain- may I tell his story well.

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8 thoughts on “O Captain! My Captain!

    1. Thank you Ken! He is the first several- John C. Barr, William Massie, and a few other lesser known guys. I appreciate all of your help! I’m hoping I can find a way to get up to Fort Benton but I may have to spend most or all of my time in Helena.

  1. I got a lump in my throat when I read this!! I am so happy for you and feel emotionally attached to your work, and to “your” captain as well. I am fully behind you as you venture forward and am extremely proud to know you and call you my UNK colleague. Congrats Kassie!!

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