Joseph Hill’s Moustache

Joseph Hill is an intriguing character in the history of the Upper Missouri. He was an early settler of the region and a prominent businessman who came from an interesting background but died from a painful growth on his spine at all too young of an age. He worked side by side with some of Montana’s greatest early businessman and had connections to none other than our old friend Captain James McGarry. Joseph Hill was part owner of the steamer Benton and served as clerk for the steamer’s maiden voyage in 1875. As you may recall if you follow my blog, McGarry oversaw the building of the Benton, was part owner, and served as her captain from 1875 through 1877.

Joseph Hill also had a rather intriguing moustache.  A face adorned with an impressive moustache was cause for high praise and even conducive to romance. For instance, take the May 7, 1875 edition of the New Northwest which shared the following supposed Spanish proverb “A kiss without a moustache is like an egg without salt.”

Joseph’s moustache was impressive enough to make the papers at least twice.  That is, to date I have found two articles and suspect there may indeed be more. Joseph’s moustache first made the newspapers when on March 11, 1875 the Helena Weekly Herald commented “Mr. Joseph Hill…is successfully growing a Missouri moustache.” It is unclear if he had difficulty growing the said moustache, if a previous calamity had befallen it, either way the demise of his moustache in 1876 made the papers. This time in the Benton Record:

Sept 1 1876 p3 col1-b

Oh what a tragedy to occur as the result of a intently reading the bible (cough, cough). We are able to glean some idea of what his moustache looked like from the details included the article. Despite the fact that the moustache was considered “young and tender,” it appears it was long since it would not grow back out until the following spring. What exactly is a Missouri moustache? I’m not sure, but, it does sound rather grand. Perhaps I can find a picture of Mr. Hill and his grand moustache when I’m out in Montana later this year.

What do you think of this article? Satire or were they serious? Perhaps a little of both? And, what of Joseph Hill’s explanation- likely or a good cover story?